Korean drama ‘Black’: The latest in the grim reaper themed-drama

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I saw a poster of this like few months ago and I thought the girl is Jung Soo-mi. Then I saw a trailer on it on Instagram via a Netflix ad.  In Korea, it just aired its final episode this past December 10. Apparently, it’s not Jung Soo-mi but Go Ara. I remember only seeing her from TVXQ’s music video of “Before U Go”.

So this drama came back to my awareness when I saw this localized trailer from ABS CBN few days ago, as the drama is set to premiere on local television this January 8.

Anyway, the concept of the girl having this ability to see the shadow of death is kinda similar to how Ji Eun-tak can see both Wang Yeo and Kim Shin and ghosts. The only difference though is that Ji Eun-tak isn’t trying to save people.

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And this shadow of death is so similar to how Wang Yeo becomes a black smoke when he disappears. And then of course, there are Grim Reapers here but there’s definitely no way anyone will ever top what #LeeDongwook has done as the Grim Reaper/Wang Yeo in “Goblin” — this is simply an acting tour de force, his career best, I must say. 

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One of the Grim Reapers on the trailer said, if she saves those people who are meant to die, the Grim Reaper that’s inhabiting Song Seung-heon’s body will receive a punishment.

This makes me think of how Kim Shin violated this very purpose in Goblin. Sure he isn’t a Grim Reaper but as a Goblin, his duty is to protect people but not save people who are meant to die, just as the case of Ji Eun-tak’s mother. But then again, if Kim Shin didn’t do this he won’t be able to meet his Bride so that he can die properly and peacefully.

So, okay, fine, it was done for the sake of Kim Shin’s story of searching for the Goblin Bride. But of course, given the fact that he intercepted and changed the course of events relating to Eun-tak, what is meant to be is still meant to be. And eventually, when the time came for Ji Eun-tak, there was no way he can ever avoid it — this time he isn’t able to do anything to trick the Grim Reaper.

There’s probably been Grim Reaper characters before in Kdrama that I don’t know. However, the Grim Reaper concept of Goblin is so ingenious. And ever since the groundbreaking success of the drama, it’s no wonder that other Kdrama are following suit tackling the same themes of death and the existence of Grim Reapers.

In any case, this one’s pretty interesting. I’d watch it.

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‘Fireworks: Should We See it from the Side or the Bottom?’: Visually stunning but lacks an engaging story

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★★★

I went to see “Fireworks: Should We See it from the Side or the Bottom?” on Wednesday, December 20. I initially planned to see it last Friday but the plan got delayed. And after finding out from SM Cinema site that the anime film runs until Sunday, Dec. 24; I decided I shouldn’t wait until Sunday because who knows if the run will be cut short and I’d unfortunately end up not watching it on the big screen anymore– so it had to be today.

The underwater opening sequence got me so mesmerized. The animation is majestic. It similarly gives me the feel of Makoto Shinkai’s works’ gorgeously animated backgrounds. I absolutely adore how the animated landscapes are drawn – everything just looks so real and beautiful. I also like the character artwork – Nazuna is one of the most beautifully drawn characters I’ve ever seen.

The main two characters, Nazuna and Norimichi are really cute together. It’s fun watching their many attempts of running away by repeating certain parts of the event (through a magical transparent ball Nazuna found by the beach) when Nazuna decided to run away after Norimichi wins the swimming race, and also due to her mother marrying again for the third time.  I definitely dig the part that they kissed under water — squeal!

And unlike most star-crossed anime couples, the guy isn’t the standard ikemen – tall and handsome, someone who’s a great match with the girl from the get-go. This time, Norimichi is actually a head shorter than Nazuna and definitely not very ikemen but he can pass up as cute, and part of the reason I’m calling him cute because he’s cute in height.

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The musical score complements the marvelous visual style so well, and while watching I’m telling myself inside my head that I need to have that original music score (by Satoru Kosaki) so I can keep listening to it. I also really love the ending theme of the same title by DAOKO and Kenshi Yonezu and the insert song, “Forever Friends” also by DAOKO.

I was a little uneasy as well with Masaki Suda’s voice acting for Norimichi. I don’t know but perhaps it’s the tone of his voice that kinda makes me think that his voice sounds so mature for the character. Nevertheless, it got better along the way though.

However, I find the story weak and very lean. It didn’t progress at all and the whole movie just focused on how they keep going back to redo things as they try to run away from Nazuna’s mother and from Yusuke, who also likes Nazuna.

There isn’t much predicament for the two characters to deal with. It would have been better if it was able to build up and expand this wonderful idea of “if only I could return to that day” or in general the “ifs” that for sure audiences have and would positively relate to. It could also have explored that mystical ball further. Story-wise, it’s where it definitely falters – lacking weight and depth.

I have a problem with the ending too. It’s so open ended that it doesn’t in any way leave me to imagine what could have happened to Nazuna and Norimichi and that is unsettling for me. It just left me there when they went swimming.

I like open ended endings, such example is “The Garden of Words”. The ending doesn’t have to show Takao and Yukari being together but the last few scenes give me this feeling that they will definitely see each other again — Takao finally finishing the shoes he made for Yukari and Yukari sending him a letter and telling him how she is.

I won’t go comparing it to “Kimi no Na wa” just because they share the same producers. Besides, this is not a work of Makoto Shinkai and Comix Wave. It’s okay to be comparing Kimi no Na wa to his other works that I so love like “5 Centimeters per Second” and “The Garden of Words” but it doesn’t seem right to me to compare every anime film that comes out after Kimi no Na wa; as if it’s the standard or something, just because it happens to be the top grossing Japanese film of all time.

I love Makoto Shinkai’s works. I am a huge fan of his animated masterpieces. However, when I think about Kimi no Na wa, before and after it premiered last year, people didn’t go comparing it to “Spirited Away”, which was holding the no. 1 spot then. So it kinda baffles me why some people compare Fireworks to Kimi no Na wa before and after its release. It wasn’t as if it was trying to topple Kimi no Na wa or something.

Most of the praises I have for Fireworks are the same for Kimi no Na wa but at the same time, Kimi no Na wa’s story was weak for me as well. It was a little too superficial for it to successfully sway me. I maintain my stand that 5 Centimeters per Second remains to be his definitive work, followed by The Garden of Words.

Fireworks is the last film I’m seeing this December before the year closes. It concludes my 2017 cinematic tour.

13th Cinema One Originals Film Festival: My World Cinema Picks

Before We Vanish: Seeing Ryuhei Matsuda on the big screen twice this year 

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Narumi Kase (Masami Nagasawa) is on bad terms with her husband Shinji Kase (Ryuhei Matsuda) until Shinji goes missing and comes back as a different person.  Meanwhile, a family is brutally murdered and an unexplained phenomenon takes place.

When Cinema Bravo unveiled the full line-up and schedules for the 13th Cinema One Originals Film Festival this past Wednesday, I immediately scrolled down to check the world cinema section, and I couldn’t help myself and jump with joy when I saw Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s “Before We Vanish,” an official selection at the Un Certain Regard section at the recent Festival de Cannes.

The film’s been on my lookout since I came to know about it late last year, all because it stars a big bias actor of mine, Ryuhei Matsuda. Since I’m keeping tabs of his films, I’m quite in the know whenever he has upcoming or new ones out in Japan.

Before We Vanish international teaser trailer

In fact, Before We Vanish was only released September 9 in Japan so that’s like just over two months of gap before it screens for the Cinema One Originals line-up. I’m totally amazed at how the Cinema One Originals committee are so quick to be able to bring these films so fast for the film fest after their run in international film festivals.

I’m totally exuberant because this will be the second time I’ll be getting to watch Ryuhei on the big screen, first at the  Eiga Sai Film Festival this past July with the film “The Mohican Comes Home” (2016).

Ever since I first got to see him on the big screen in “Tada’s Do-It-All House: Disconcerto” (2014), courtesy again of the Japan Foundation’s Eiga Sai Film Fest, his films have been  common fixtures in the line-up every year. It was just unfortunate though when I missed my favorite “The Great Passage” (2013) at last year’s Eiga Sai because of my birthday trip overseas but I’ve seen the movie before this on television via Red by HBO.

So I’m just totally in a euphoric state that I will get to see his latest film, Before We Vanish on the big screen. It’s all thanks to Cinema One Originals for bringing the film for the festival.

As for his director, Kiyoshi Kurosawa, this will be the first time I’ll be seeing a film from the Japanese horror master as he is known in the industry. Just like Hirokazu Koreeda, he’s venturing into new territories with Before We Vanish, which is science fiction, a genre that isn’t very common in the Japanese movie industry. However, it seems Kurosawa has more diverse genres in his films than Koreeda.

His thriller film “Creepy” (2016) was among the line-up at this year’s Eiga Sai but I didn’t get to watch it but I’ve heard of him first from the film “Journey to the Shore” (2015), I think last year as it was part of Cinema One Originals but just the same I haven’t seen it and also “Bright Future” (2003).

The Third Murder: Hirokazu Koreeda’s change of pace

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Shigemori (Masaharu Fukuyama) is an elite lawyer who takes the case of Mikuma (Koji Yakusho), a self-confessed murderer to a crime that happened 30 years ago. Facing the death sentence, Shigemori begins to doubt if Mikuma is the real murderer.

For this film, “The Third Murder,” the reason why this is part of my shortlist is not because of the actor/s but more on the director, Hirokazu Koreeda, as I have seen quite a number of his films before that I really like or love.

IndieWire calls Hirokazu Koreeda as Japan’s “greatest living humanist filmmaker” and I really think this is one of the best ways to describe him. However, their review says about his latest film, The Third Murder, a rare misfire and an unwelcome change of pace.

The Third Murder English Subtitled Trailer

Toronto International Film Festival and The Guardian (The Third Murder review – death-sentence drama leaves you hanging) both have positive reviews.

I myself is actually a little surprised when this came to my awareness few months ago because it’s nothing like any of his works that center on family life and its complexities. And it seems like this is the first time he’s venturing outside the style that he is known for. 

Among my favorites from him are definitely “Like Father, Like Son” (which I saw from the 2015 Eiga Sai Film Fest) and “Our Little Sister” (which I missed from the 2016 Eiga Sai because of a trip but was able to watch at home). I also like “I Wish” (the one with Joe Odagiri and Bae Doo-na) and “After Life”. I have yet to watch last year’s “After the Storm” that stars Hiroshi Abe, Yoko Maki and Kiki Kirin.

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A lot of familiar names are here who starred in his previous films — Masaharu Fukuyama (Like Father, Like Son), Lily Franky (Like Father, Like Son), Suzu Hirose (Our Little Sister). Koji Yakusho also stars but I’m not sure if he’s starred in any of Koreeda’s films before, he’s in a number of Takashi Miike movies than Koreeda.

Despite the sudden change of direction, I’m gonna give this a shot, just because I’m aware of the quality of Hirokazu Koreeda’s films and that he always or most often than not delivers.

Call Me By Your Name: This year’s best of summer love

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Italy, summer of 1983, precocious 17-year-old Elio (Timothée Chalamet) is spending the summer at his parents’ villa in Lombardy when he meets Oliver (Armie Hammer ), a doctoral student and intern of his father. Amid the sun-drenched splendor of their surroundings, Elio and Oliver discover the heady beauty of awakening desire over the course of a summer that will alter their lives forever.

Out of my three shortlisted films, only one isn’t Japanese nor Asian, and that is  Luca Guadagnino’s film adaptation of the 2007 novel of the same name by André Aciman, “Call Me By Your Name,” starring Armie Hammer and Timothée Chalamet, that had its debut at the Sundance Film Festival and is now garnering a place as one of the favorites to win best picture Oscar in February. 

In this case, neither the director nor the actors is my reason for choosing it. I saw the trailer to this few months back but I don’t remember how I came to find it on YouTube, but I was enamored by how beautiful it is from the trailer alone. The only cast that I know of is Armie Hammer but the rest of the cast and the director are fairly new to me.

Call Me By Your Name Trailer

I also can’t help but take notice of the song playing in the latter half of the trailer, and how it makes me wanna watch the film even more with it. I went looking for the song and it’s called “Mystery of Love” by Sufjan Stevens, who also composed the song specifically for the film, as well as two more songs included in the original motion picture soundtrack. Now I’m thinking of getting the OST.

From the looks of it, it won’t be hard for me to fall in love with this film when I see it in full.

The 13th Cinema One Originals Film Festival runs on November 13-21 at Trinoma, Glorietta, Gateway, UP Cine Adarna, Cinema 76 and Cinematheque, and extended run from November 22-28 at the PowerPlant Mall.

Haruki Murakami and the Nobel Prize in Literature

Nobel prize: Chronicle of wound-up ‘Harukists’ as Murakami fails to win

This piece is in reaction to the article above from BBC and regarding the recent announcement of the awardee for Nobel Prize in Literature.

So, Margaret Atwood, author of “The Handmaid’s Tale”, also hasn’t been awarded or recognized by the Nobel Prize (in Literature)), same as Haruki Murakami.

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Photo by The New Yorker

I don’t know much about Margaret Atwood nor about the new Nobel Prize in Literature awardee, Kazuo Ishiguro, because I’ve never read any of their works, which goes to say that I can never really assess anything. I do know Ishiguro by his name, specifically from his novel, “Never Let Me Go.”  I’m sure they’re both deserving in their own particular ways, especially in reference to Ishiguro, who’s the latest to win the Prize.

When I read the other day that Ishiguro’s been awarded the Prize; definitely, I thought of Haruki Murakami and how there’s bound to be news all over the internet again about how the coveted prize has eluded him for the nth time and how Harukists all over the world are disappointed yet again.

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Photo from RAPTIS RARE BOOKS

As for me, being a proud and dedicated Haruki Murakami fan, of course, it’s inevitable that I’m saddened too because he’s very much deserving of this Prize as well, just as much as Margaret Atwood, Salman Rushdie, and Cormac McCarthy; names as mentioned by Ishiguro himself.

“Part of me feels like an imposter and part of me feels bad that I’ve got this before other living writers. “Haruki Murakami, Salman Rushdie, Margaret Atwood, Cormac McCarthy, all of them immediately came into my head and I just thought wow, this is a bit of a cheek for me to have been given this before them,” says Ishiguro.

I may be accused of being bias by other people who may not have read Murakami but I don’t go this way. I don’t make assessments on whether I love or strongly dislike certain things – novels that I read, movies that I watch, and music that I listen to; by basing on just a single reason of being a fan. I have instances that even though I really love this actor, I have this sense that I don’t really like this film of his because there’s something lacking that I’m looking for.

Then again, Mr. Haruki Murakami himself doesn’t seem to care much about winning or winning it at all. He’s just not the kind of individual that’s motivated or driven by awards and such. He’s not doing what he’s doing just because he wants these recognitions. I think it’s the fans who are more driven and want the Prize for him (of course, I want the Prize for him) more than Mr. Murakami himself.

The Nobel Prize and the Oscars

However, I also feel that the Nobel Prize is just like the Oscars in some ways. The Oscars go a lot with hype more than the quality, strength, and the lasting impact of the performance and the role.

I heard that the Academy Awards’ panel of judges don’t even watch all of the films nominated, so they base more on the buzz that’s going around these films, which is why production studios are giving it a lot when it comes to marketing and publicity. And there are those that are intentionally out to win awards more than anything, even more than box office returns.

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Ryan Gosling as jazz musician, Sebastian in La La Land

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Emma Stone as aspiring actress Mia in La La Land

This is the reason why I’m not happy with Emma Stone winning over other stronger performances. As much as I love La La Land, I just feel that either Isabelle Huppert or Ruth Negga should have won. Same with Ryan, his role Sebastian is a lot more complex than Emma’s emotional cry baby Mia but the judges just love emotional acting and characters like that which are kinda typical already for me.

I strongly feel this is the same case with the Nobel Prize in Literature (since I don’t really know much with the other categories and their controversies). I guess they have this preference over English-language authors than authors writing in their native language like Japanese that must be translated first before it gets published internationally.

Foreign languages have their exquisitely-innate hidden beauty, that when they’re translated, they have more depth and meaning and evoke more emotions and intensity in readers than the original English written ones. It’s just like how there’s such a different feeling to listening to non-English songs.

The preference on social realism 

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I discussed with my older brother, who has read Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go, and he thinks that the Nobel committee prefers authors who write about social realism, just as also the case with Gael Garcia Marquez’ novel, “100 Years of Solitude”, who has already been awarded by the Nobel Prize.

Social realism or in simpler definition, is something that can easily relate to the real world and real life; and these are the kinds that win the Literature Prize.

And that while Never Let Me Go’s story is science fiction, it uses that scenario to get its message across, which is about clones that are made only to be organ donors to the original.

With Haruki Murakami, his style is made of weird, surreal, out of this world themes, which probably come across as escapism to the committee. I do agree with my brother on this, and these are also the reasons why I read his novels, why I’m such a fan.

And when he said social realism, I said Murakami has that too, although not very often in most of his novels. I gave “Norwegian Wood” (1997 / 2000), “South of the Border (1992 / 2006), and “Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage” (2013 / 2014) as examples. I further said that to me, character-wise and story-wise, Norwegian Wood and Colorless Tsukuru are somewhat close to each other.

However, for him, there’s still something weird and unusual about Tsukuru, and he thinks that Norwegian Wood is the only novel that’s different from the rest of Murakami’s novels. Well, I kinda agree again, when comparing Toru and Tsukuru, Toru does come out more of a real-life person than Tsukuru, but I think this is also the reason why Tsukuru Tazaki is able to supplant Toru Watanabe as my favorite Murakami character and my no. 1 favorite Murakami novel now. I relate to both of them highly but I think I have more affinity with Tsukuru.

Then he pointed out Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, “To Kill a Mockingbird” (1960) as an example of novels that also win the Nobel Literature Prize.

With this aspect, then my theory about the similarity of The Academy Awards and The Nobel Prize is further confirmed — “Moonlight” that’s about racism, coming-of-age, LGBT, and bullying, winning best picture over “La La Land” or Casey Affleck’s dramatic grief-stricken man who suddenly becomes the guardian of his nephew in “Manchester by the Sea” over Ryan Gosling’s inspiring and logical jazz musician who learned how to compromise for both his dream and love in “La La Land.”

 

When something can never be rom-com

What ‘Last Night’ gets wrong about suicide

I saw the trailer to this and I find it bleh. I didn’t get anything out of the trailer of what it’s exactly about, at least, and I see Piolo and Toni looking at each other at a balcony of a nice-looking building or a hotel, all cutesy and lovey dovey. So this alone reduced the possibility of me ever watching it to total zero. However, I’d like to point it’s easy on the eyes, it’s nice to look at but that’s all there is to me.

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And then I read this review from CNN Phils (link above), which is a very well-written review, such an in-depth take, and so I find out that it’s about suicide — only this movie makes suicide such a trivial matter; that it’s a fun game while the “one-dimensional characters” are trying to think of horrendous ways of killing themselves and laughing it off every time they fail; that suicide can be a platform for tender moments, romance and falling in love; that one can be driven to suicide all because of a single event in the form of a break-up; that the decision to commit suicide is instantaneous; that this feeling of positivism and wanting to live again is also instantaneous for suicidal people (as if you just bumped your head lightly); and that after a failed attempt, one recovers so easily (with no serious after-thought or trauma of what was done).

It’s the kind of the film that I don’t even have to watch to know how it goes and how it ends. Besides, the review is highly detailed already. I can easily picture the scenes in my head while reading the review. I can’t blame the review for being spoiler-filled because she has to clearly point out the examples. It’s needed. After all, with or without spoilers, it’s the kind of film that’s ultimately predictable.

From the review alone, it already makes me think that it gives off the wrong message about suicide. Instead of making audiences have deeper understanding of suicidal people and mental issues, it encourages the idea that it’s fun to think of ways to kill yourself and that you can think of many creative ideas to do it, and that maybe in the process of trying to commit suicide, suddenly there’s a Romeo that’s out to save you and then, what else, of course they fall in love.

A college friend of mine (who watched the film) commented that it’s Carmina (Toni Gonzaga) who ended up saving Mark (Piolo), convincing him that life is worth living, but this doesn’t erase the fact that Mark still saved Carmina from that failed suicide attempt by the bridge (an example of a Romeo out to save a girl in the process of a suicide attempt).

My friend adds that “it doesn’t really encourage suicide but the message is that life is worth living.” Let’s say that’s the aim of the movie but by approaching the sensitive subject of suicide lightly and making it an avenue of fun, cutesy, and flirty interactions between the characters absolutely supplants that very message.

And then there’s this line. Mark tells Carmina, “Ayaw mo talagang magpakamatay. Nagpapapansin ka lang.”

If you’re an individual, whether or not you know someone who once tried to commit suicide or encountered it yourself, at least one should have an understanding that this very dialogue is so wrong. It’s because suicide should be taken seriously and not like a joke, like someone’s just acting all “papansin” (attention-seeking) and that he/she is not really going to do it even when they already showed signs and openly talked about suicidal thoughts.

Depression and suicide and others in anime and manga

The review cites “The Hours” and “Little Miss Sunshine” as good examples of films with the context of suicide and depression. As for me, I think of Ichigo Takano’s manga/anime series, “Orange” and Reiko Yoshida’s manga/anime film, “A Silent Voice” (Koe no Katachi), both of which are highly-acclaimed hits for their wonderfully-deep and well thought-out telling of depression, suicide, guilt, regrets, forgiveness, of past and present, bullying, redemption, friendship, second chances, and disability.

All these have become my anime favorites because they make me realize about so many things that matter. With Orange, I empathize so much to the main character, Kakeru and his strong sense of guilt for what happened to his mother and for Koe no Katachi, to Shouko, who is deaf and gets ostracized for being different and Shouya, for realizing the deep consequences of what he’s done to Shouko when they were kids.

Orange has love story in it but it isn’t the main focus, it’s a subplot; same goes with Koe no Katachi, the romance here doesn’t even come to light directly and is only implied.

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Another great example is also Makoto Shinkai’s definitive work, “5 Centimeters per Second” (2007) that astoundingly exemplifies the complexities and frailties of human connections and how these affect and change someone drastically, to the point of not seeing any sense in life anymore.

The same themes in literary fiction

In literary fiction, I can think of my top two favorite Haruki Murakami novels: “Norwegian Wood” (1987) and “Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage” (2014) as the books that gave me insight into depression and suicide and the tremendous trauma that affects the people who are left behind.

There are some subjects that you cannot make out to be humorous, fun, or romantic, and this is one example of that subject. It makes me wonder why do they always try to inject romance in everything. Makes me wonder if they’re trying to mimic the hype of “13 Reasons Why”, the novel-turned-Netflix series (which I will never see or read), only difference is this is rom-com. Makes me wonder why it always has to be cutesy.

* My own perspective is mine alone. It doesn’t apply to everyone.*

Norwegian Wood: A letter to Toru

When I saw this nicely illustrated letter some days ago on Pinterest, it instantly made me want to browse through the pages of “Norwegian Wood”, more so because this is a part from Midori.

It’s been years since I decided to pick up Norwegian Wood and read it despite initially looking for Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, the one recommended by a classmate from college. I didn’t find Wind-Up Bird at A Different Bookstore at Greenhills and that’s how I ended up discovering Norwegian Wood and falling in love with it. This book is also why I adore the name Midori.

I got the Vintage International, September 2000 edition, so it’s like five or six years later, maybe 2005 or 2006 when I read it. Amazingly, the pages are still intact but of course, it has shown its years with its now dark brown pages and its woody scent.

And since then, it’s always been one of my most favorite novels and my top Murakami book, until “Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage” came along in 2014 (read in 2015) and dethroned it from its number one spot.

 

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From the start, I’ve always rooted for Midori for Toru in this story. And this letter of Midori to Toru from page 252 is one testament of how much I love this character.

These following parts of this letter simply make my literary heart aflutter.

“I would have been able to forgive you for being sunk in a million thoughts.”

“Go ahead and think away to your heart’s content.”

“You’re all locked up in that little world of yours, and when I try knocking on the door, you just sort of look up for a second and go right back inside.”

“But you’re about as sensitive as a steel plate.”

Blade Runner anime short: Black Out

I just saw Blade Runner anime short – Blade Runner: Black Out, and it makes me feel like I wanna watch a full series of anime Blade Runner. Can we get an animated version of Ryan Gosling, director Shinichiro Watanabe?

From live action to anime / From anime to live action

It’s ironic how an original live action film/series, when it becomes an anime version; most often, the anime version enhances the original, or at par with the original and at times, even better than the original.

Blade Runner: Black Out is an original anime short though, but it’s still based on an original live action film, and serves as the prequel and bridge between the original 1982 film and the new Blade Runner that’s out starting next Friday.

However, this is not the case when it’s the other way around — when anime is the one being turned into live action version, such as the awful case of Netflix’ Death Note and Ghost in the Shell. Then there’s also the ever escalating dread to the newly-announced Hollywood remake of 2016’s biggest hit, that is Makoto Shinkai’s Kimi no Na wa (Your Name). And more of that dread is expected to spread like wildfire up to when Paramount with JJ Abrams on the helm, finally reveals a teaser of the live action remake.