Book Love – A Geek in Japan

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I’m finally able to snap my very first travel related book acquisition after not seeing my camera for (4) months.

I missed you Canon, you’ve been away for (4) months without me, at least one of us got to go away this year and had a really long vacation. I’m so envious, you got to see places I didn’t see. 

I bought the camera last January and been looking forward for another trip by myself this year and having to use this camera, unfortunately I wasn’t able to do so this time. It’s a promise I made to  myself but having failed for the first time ever since I started it, I just feel bad about it.

In any case, I’m loving this book. On An Extremely Brief History of Japan (page 10,chapter 1), it says that Japan was born of the love between two deities: Izanagi and Izanami. These two deities had a daughter named Amaterasu, and the long dynasty of Japanese emperors descends from her.

When I read the names Izanagi, Izanami and Amaterasu; I was like “Oh my, Naruto!” Kishimoto Masashi must have taken inspiration from Japanese history to create the Uchiha clan’s signature Izanami, Izanagi and Amaterasu jutsu.

When I got into Naruto years ago, I heard that tailed beasts like Kurama for instance came from Japanese folklore. But I didn’t know much about it other than that basic information, so when I read the chapter about visiting shrines and temples in Japan, I found out that sacred foxes or “kitsune” in Japanese is a common sight in Shinto shrines. They are believed to be messengers of Inari – the god of fertility. A sacred fox’ power can be determined by the number of its tails, the more tails it has means the more powerful it is. When it has nine tails, the highest number of tails it can have; it means it is of the most powerful kind.  I instantly thought of Kurama and nothing else. This just shows how Naruto is so attached and faithful to its Japanese heritage and history.

A Geek in Japan is definitely a great buy. It’s like a one-stop shop of everything Japanese, an efficient way of learning about the basics on culture and people without being seriously academic.

 

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