‘A Second Chance’ : Love’s Lost Identities

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I wasn’t intending to read a review about A Second Chance this morning (Nov.29) but I read it anyway, though I’m not particularly influenced by reviews, from ClickTheCity by Philbert Dy. One important thing he mentioned was about the ending. And when Anna and I saw the movie today, I finally understood what he meant.

Like the review, I’d give it 4*/5 because I was a little disappointed with the ending. I feel like the writers rushed it too much, that they had to force them to make amends with each other. If it were told the other way, it would have been a lot better.

If I were the writer, which I’m not, but I wanted Popoy to leave for London so he could reclaim himself, the talented engineer and the self-respect he lost from all the circumstances, and because it is also what Basha needs.

I wanted to see Popoy doing well in London and Basha happy managing the firm, that despite being away, they remain to be married and are gradually patching things up the long-distance way. They just need some time and distance apart to regain the identities they’ve lost and to come back to who they really were as individuals.

I can honestly say that I like this one better than the first because this time it isn’t only about petty quarrels, wanting for space, being controlled, breaking-up, getting back together. They’re dealing with matters of more weight this time, of matters they promised at the altar to face together.

***

I honestly think Popoy and Basha rushed into things. For me, they didn’t really have to get married right away after getting back together. They could have continued on with their own separate careers as an engineer and an architect.

In the last scene from One More Chance, he did say he won’t be going away anymore but really that could change. It’s an honest to goodness opportunity that will benefit the two of them in the long run. He should have taken the London offer. And there’s also the idea of putting up their own firm, it was too soon. I felt like they didn’t think about it properly, like they just felt the need to put up their own because now they are married. Because let’s face it, when you work with your wife or husband, you’re definitely bound to get into big arguments combining that of personal matters. It’s a one big mess. At the end of all this, it was all because they love each other.

I also felt bad for Popoy. I get that part of the fault is his because he allowed matters escalate to its worst. But if there’s anyone who’s most disappointed, it’s him. He wanted to rush things, in two years, he would have already built the dream home that he promised to Basha, so he ended up taking too many projects. It was beyond him, and it wasn’t all his fault as well. He lied to her because he didn’t want to hurt her, but of course she’ll eventually find out and that will hurt her more.

Basha decided to stay with him and took¬†matters in her hands, but everytime, she shoves it in his face without saying anything that she’s right, that she’s the one taking charge of everything now, that he should have listened to her all along. It’s like everyday, she’s making less of Popoy, of what’s little that’s remained of Popoy’s respect for himself from the events that happened.

But I’m also not dismissing the challenges Basha had to face, like the loss of their supposed first baby, how they’re trying to get pregnant again but it just won’t work, and how she keeps wondering why Popoy’s always in a hostile mood but she keeps trying to reach out to him.

I also find the calamity proof structure interesting. If one really thinks about it, Popoy has a good point of trying to get the idea out, pitching it to clients, and that one day someone is going to understand and believe in the idea. Because if he never tried to put it out, then it’ll feel like he’s already lost when he hasn’t started anything about it. Although I have to admit that the idea may be a little too advanced for some, or that Popoy is thinking¬†too much beyond since it all depends on what they need or want.

They both had difficulties of their own despite being married, and because they’re shielding each other from the possible pain and anger, that very love that they’re holding onto is also what’s driving them apart. And as they grow more into strangers, they’re slowly losing how to trust each other and losing the identities of the people they originally married.