13th Cinema One Originals Film Festival: My World Cinema Picks

Before We Vanish: Seeing Ryuhei Matsuda on the big screen twice this year 

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Narumi Kase (Masami Nagasawa) is on bad terms with her husband Shinji Kase (Ryuhei Matsuda) until Shinji goes missing and comes back as a different person.  Meanwhile, a family is brutally murdered and an unexplained phenomenon takes place.

When Cinema Bravo unveiled the full line-up and schedules for the 13th Cinema One Originals Film Festival this past Wednesday, I immediately scrolled down to check the world cinema section, and I couldn’t help myself and jump with joy when I saw Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s “Before We Vanish,” an official selection at the Un Certain Regard section at the recent Festival de Cannes.

The film’s been on my lookout since I came to know about it late last year, all because it stars a big bias actor of mine, Ryuhei Matsuda. Since I’m keeping tabs of his films, I’m quite in the know whenever he has upcoming or new ones out in Japan.

Before We Vanish international teaser trailer

In fact, Before We Vanish was only released September 9 in Japan so that’s like just over two months of gap before it screens for the Cinema One Originals line-up. I’m totally amazed at how the Cinema One Originals committee are so quick to be able to bring these films so fast for the film fest after their run in international film festivals.

I’m totally exuberant because this will be the second time I’ll be getting to watch Ryuhei on the big screen, first at the  Eiga Sai Film Festival this past July with the film “The Mohican Comes Home” (2016).

Ever since I first got to see him on the big screen in “Tada’s Do-It-All House: Disconcerto” (2014), courtesy again of the Japan Foundation’s Eiga Sai Film Fest, his films have been  common fixtures in the line-up every year. It was just unfortunate though when I missed my favorite “The Great Passage” (2013) at last year’s Eiga Sai because of my birthday trip overseas but I’ve seen the movie before this on television via Red by HBO.

So I’m just totally in a euphoric state that I will get to see his latest film, Before We Vanish on the big screen. It’s all thanks to Cinema One Originals for bringing the film for the festival.

As for his director, Kiyoshi Kurosawa, this will be the first time I’ll be seeing a film from the Japanese horror master as he is known in the industry. Just like Hirokazu Koreeda, he’s venturing into new territories with Before We Vanish, which is science fiction, a genre that isn’t very common in the Japanese movie industry. However, it seems Kurosawa has more diverse genres in his films than Koreeda.

His thriller film “Creepy” (2016) was among the line-up at this year’s Eiga Sai but I didn’t get to watch it but I’ve heard of him first from the film “Journey to the Shore” (2015), I think last year as it was part of Cinema One Originals but just the same I haven’t seen it and also “Bright Future” (2003).

The Third Murder: Hirokazu Koreeda’s change of pace

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Shigemori (Masaharu Fukuyama) is an elite lawyer who takes the case of Mikuma (Koji Yakusho), a self-confessed murderer to a crime that happened 30 years ago. Facing the death sentence, Shigemori begins to doubt if Mikuma is the real murderer.

For this film, “The Third Murder,” the reason why this is part of my shortlist is not because of the actor/s but more on the director, Hirokazu Koreeda, as I have seen quite a number of his films before that I really like or love.

IndieWire calls Hirokazu Koreeda as Japan’s “greatest living humanist filmmaker” and I really think this is one of the best ways to describe him. However, their review says about his latest film, The Third Murder, a rare misfire and an unwelcome change of pace.

The Third Murder English Subtitled Trailer

Toronto International Film Festival and The Guardian (The Third Murder review – death-sentence drama leaves you hanging) both have positive reviews.

I myself is actually a little surprised when this came to my awareness few months ago because it’s nothing like any of his works that center on family life and its complexities. And it seems like this is the first time he’s venturing outside the style that he is known for. 

Among my favorites from him are definitely “Like Father, Like Son” (which I saw from the 2015 Eiga Sai Film Fest) and “Our Little Sister” (which I missed from the 2016 Eiga Sai because of a trip but was able to watch at home). I also like “I Wish” (the one with Joe Odagiri and Bae Doo-na) and “After Life”. I have yet to watch last year’s “After the Storm” that stars Hiroshi Abe, Yoko Maki and Kiki Kirin.

afterstorm

A lot of familiar names are here who starred in his previous films — Masaharu Fukuyama (Like Father, Like Son), Lily Franky (Like Father, Like Son), Suzu Hirose (Our Little Sister). Koji Yakusho also stars but I’m not sure if he’s starred in any of Koreeda’s films before, he’s in a number of Takashi Miike movies than Koreeda.

Despite the sudden change of direction, I’m gonna give this a shot, just because I’m aware of the quality of Hirokazu Koreeda’s films and that he always or most often than not delivers.

Call Me By Your Name: This year’s best of summer love

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Italy, summer of 1983, precocious 17-year-old Elio (Timothée Chalamet) is spending the summer at his parents’ villa in Lombardy when he meets Oliver (Armie Hammer ), a doctoral student and intern of his father. Amid the sun-drenched splendor of their surroundings, Elio and Oliver discover the heady beauty of awakening desire over the course of a summer that will alter their lives forever.

Out of my three shortlisted films, only one isn’t Japanese nor Asian, and that is  Luca Guadagnino’s film adaptation of the 2007 novel of the same name by André Aciman, “Call Me By Your Name,” starring Armie Hammer and Timothée Chalamet, that had its debut at the Sundance Film Festival and is now garnering a place as one of the favorites to win best picture Oscar in February. 

In this case, neither the director nor the actors is my reason for choosing it. I saw the trailer to this few months back but I don’t remember how I came to find it on YouTube, but I was enamored by how beautiful it is from the trailer alone. The only cast that I know of is Armie Hammer but the rest of the cast and the director are fairly new to me.

Call Me By Your Name Trailer

I also can’t help but take notice of the song playing in the latter half of the trailer, and how it makes me wanna watch the film even more with it. I went looking for the song and it’s called “Mystery of Love” by Sufjan Stevens, who also composed the song specifically for the film, as well as two more songs included in the original motion picture soundtrack. Now I’m thinking of getting the OST.

From the looks of it, it won’t be hard for me to fall in love with this film when I see it in full.

The 13th Cinema One Originals Film Festival runs on November 13-21 at Trinoma, Glorietta, Gateway, UP Cine Adarna, Cinema 76 and Cinematheque, and extended run from November 22-28 at the PowerPlant Mall.

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