38th MIBF: Early Christmas from Catholic Book Center

Some wonderfully cute and adorable Christmas decors, from Christmas houses, Santa Claus chimes, winter snow globes, glowing angels and snow man, and other Christmas table figurines from Catholic Book Center booth.

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38th MIBF: My last day, last hour visit

 

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My last day, last hour visit at the 38th Manila International Book Fair. #MIBF2017

I didn’t even go early or at least during the afternoon. I decided to just drop by and spend at least an hour to take a look. I wasn’t really intending to buy anything unless I see those that I like or something interesting.

I wasn’t really in a hurry to beat the 8pm closing so I wasn’t really minding the time. It was already 8:30pm and I’m still at the Fully Booked area and there’s still a lot of people so I took my own sweet time looking at every shelf. I eventually finished and decided to pay at 9pm and finally thought I should get myself some food.

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Not a fan of Precious Pages books but those two standee of anime guys caught my eyes.

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Rocco Nacino, Joross Gamboa, Luis Alandy, Marco Alcaraz, Precious Quigaman, and Richard Quan at the stage area on Sunday. 

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Tokyo Ghoul live action: My independent perspective

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This is the first instance I ever watched something on the first day, last screening though because I don’t wanna miss it like when I almost didn’t get to watch Your Lie in April back in December.

Not a fan of the anime as I haven’t seen it but I’m quite familiar and so far has watched some clips before seeing the film. But every time there’s a live action adaptation of manga-anime series, I always wanna check out the trailer to see if I should watch it. Then I saw the trailer of this coupled with a great ending song, I was floored and quickly decided I’ll see it.

As far as reviews go, it’s generally positive. As for me, it doesn’t disappoint from my stand-alone view of not comparing to the anime-manga of course, so I’m not saying anything about how faithful the film is from the manga, which is pointed out as one of the strong points of the film.

I enjoyed watching it and I really like it because it has a great cast that’s suitable for the characters they portray, has good balance of drama and action, the scenes and pace play out well meaning it doesn’t drag, it isn’t so gory or too violent for me, the cinematography — I love the cold dark color and atmosphere of the film, I love the effects of the kagune — it really gives me the creeps, love the fight scenes, it’s so well-done, particularly that climactic face-off between Kaneki and Amon (Masataka Kubota and Nobuyuki Suzuki really executed this part really good), and not to forget really strong performances from the cast, specifically Nobuyuki Suzuki as Amon, Yu Aoi as Rize, Yu Oizumi as CCG investigator Mado and Masataka Kubota as Ken Kaneki.

I’m so amazed right now with Masataka, that part when he gets all consumed and deranged by his ghoul instincts and about to kill and eat Amon is the highlight of his performance as Kaneki. He gets all the craziness of this character all in the right ways, even when he was still the nerd human Kaneki.

He gets my respect from this performance. I do know him from Death Note TV series but haven’t seen it but after researching him, I found out he earned a best actor award as Light. This reminds me of how Kenichi Matsuyama also earned awards from his performance as L from the Death Note movies, but this time the cards are on Light’s side for having the stronger and more talented actor between the two. #MasatakaKubota

With this, the film makes me wanna watch the anime now and I’m now considering seeing Death Note TV series despite being uninterested when I first heard about it — one reason is that I’m not exactly okay with YamaKen as L.

Kakeru, Kousei, Kou: A trio of profound suffering

 

First, I knew about Kou then Kousei and now Kakeru and then it hit me, that these three form a deep puzzle.

When I came to the realization that their names all start with the same letter — letter K, I’m like ‘what kind of enchantment is this?’ It feels like it’s meant to be, maybe intentional or perhaps pure coincidence.

Besides the first name initial, these three have issues that concern their mothers but of course not in the same exact manner — one’s mom passed away due to an illness and he can’t forgive himself because he feels responsible in taking care of his mom as he promised to his brother when their parents got divorced, thinking if only he paid more attention then he would have noticed it (Kou); the other whose mom is so ruthless that she beats him which ends up with the son finally blowing up and cursing that he hopes she dies and ultimately it does happen (Kousei); and finally, a boy’s mom who’s sickly, also divorced when he was little and who needed her son to be with her at the hospital, to which he initially agreed but changed his mind to hang out with his new friends and informing her in a not so pleasing manner, which was followed by the mother breaking down and committing suicide (Kakeru).

All three have high sense of guilt, self-hate, and extreme trauma — depression. They deal with it in different manners but similarly, their behaviors and perspectives have all changed.

Out of the three, I’d say Kakeru has the most difficult depression because he’s reached that suicidal tendency stage unlike Kou and Kousei. Then again, what Kousei said to his mom is more distressing than what Kakeru did but Kakeru ended up feeling more guilty than Kousei as people have different reactions to such situations. Kousei, I think, at the end of the series, might have subtle suicidal tendencies after suffering a double blow when Kaori passed on but I guess Tsubaki is the key so that he could avoid it.

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On a side note,  Kakeru and Kou could really pass as twin brothers, seriously. I instantly thought of Kou the first time Kakeru made an appearance except the hairstyle and the eyes. Even Futaba and Naho are so alike other than the hairstyle and color and their eyes.

Orange anime series and my Japanese inclination for such stories

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Orange has been on my list since late last year while I was occupied with Shigatsu wa Kimi no Uso (Your Lie in April). I’ve been listening to its soundtrack from early this year without having even started the anime series and now it’s on repeat again as I’m finally watching it.

Stories such as (depression and suicide) Orange tend to have gravitational pull towards me. It’s been a strong predilection for me but my very first venture and exposure to such themes was when I read Norwegian Wood by Haruki Murakami back in college (Thanks to a college classmate’s recommendation). In this, three people committed suicide — Kizuki, who killed himself when he was 17, Reiko, and then eventually Naoko who had been struggling with the loss of Kizuki.

Then in Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki, which is now my favorite Murakami novel, there’s also suicide and depression with the character of Shiro.

With anime both series and films, such examples among my favorites are 5 Centimeters per Second’s Takaki, Ao Haru Ride’s Kou, Shigatsu wa Kimi no Uso’s Kousei, Koe no Katachi’s Shoya and Shouko, and then this anime series — Orange with Kakeru, which is set to become among my favorite anime series.

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Apart from the same themes, these are all Japanese. Even Kizuki’s suicide and Kakeru’s suicide in the alternative timeline are similar — both are 17.

Depression and suicide are highly complex because both are psychological and even more difficult to explain than any kind of medical illness.

I’m starting to wonder why I have so much attachment to characters and stories with the said elements. On my take, it’s something I deeply contemplate about. A close friend said, it’s because it’s something I can understand but perhaps it’s more than that.

Manga Hokusai Manga at the Ateneo Art Gallery

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Manga Hokusai Manga: Approaching the Master’s Compendium from the Perspective of Contemporary Comics 

The exhibit runs until July 28 at the Ateneo Art Gallery.

An international traveling exhibition organized by the Japan Foundation is an exploration of the similarities and differences between Katsushika Hokusai’s manga and modern Japanese manga, with works from seven contemporary manga artists from the basis and influence of Hokusai’s manga.

Before I checked out the exhibit, I attended “Manga and the ‘Manga-esque’:
Shifting Definitions and Perspectives,” a lecture by Dr. Karl Ian Uy Cheng Chua, director of the Ateneo de Manila University – Japanese Studies Program. 

The talk centers on how “manga” and the perceptions of “manga” have changed, and how “manga” is consumed and produced in the Philippine context. The talk hopes to present the expansive reach and influence of manga, as well the problems it can encounter overseas.

Dr. Chua started by asking ‘what is manga?’ My answer to that — it’s a drawing with a story, it has Japanese characters, has Japanese context, it has panels and dialogue balloons, that it is read from right to left, and that it’s a source material for anime and film adaptations. I didn’t say it though, it was just in my head while talking to myself. 


To me, I think of manga as very Japanese because it’s highly culturally-rooted. It’s no longer manga to me when there’s no element of being Japanese in it — not the creator, not the story, nothing; even though the style is like a manga, I would only call it copying a manga but not a manga.

I was in a dilemma when Dr. Chua showed on the presentation some examples and I found myself at loss and confusion if it’s manga or not.

I realized that defining manga is complex as there’s no standard definition as compared to Hokusai’s manga. The definition and perceptions as to whether one is to be called a manga is now not only based on the cultural appropriateness of the content — the style, story, and characters. It’s expansive and ever-changing depending on one’s basis and analysis on why one would categorize it as manga whether it’s made by a Japanese mangaka or not. 

Everything Japanese

 

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The last day of Eiga Sai Ph at the Shang Cineplex was on July 16, Sunday. And like how the film festival always starts during the first week of July, it also always concludes before or after my birthday — so the dates always include my birthday. However, this year it actually concluded on my birthday.

It kinda reminds me of how Harry Potter either premieres a new movie before or after my birthday or during November. It’s only either July or November.

I decided to skip Saturday, July 15 screening of “Anthem of the Heart” and ended up losing P100 because I already have a ticket but then again, if I went I would have lost more money than just P100 because I would have to spend more.

So I opted to watch something on the last day instead. Initially, I was looking at watching Naomi Kawase’s “Sweet Bean” despite having doubts about it for having read negative reviews when it premiered at the 2015 Cannes Film Festival.

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Then again, I couldn’t watch it because I was again late and so I ended up watching the documentary “Tsukiji Wonderland.” The docu is part of my shortlist but not really a high priority but I must say, it’s a better choice to have watched the docu instead.

I may have missed seeing inside the Tsukiji Fish Market last year, I only saw it from the outside on my late night walk; seeing the documentary makes me feel like I had ventured into every corner of the fish market in reality. And because I love fish, it was a sight how the Japanese put so much high regard with the fresh seafood culture and how they both have fun and in-depth knowledge about what they do and take pride in it.

 

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A lime torte cake that I was able to buy on a last-minute decision from Starbucks because it’s the only one that’s open when I went out of Shang. 
I haven’t had a cake since Ryuchan’s birthday last May 9th. I say it like I was actually there on his birthday. Delusional me.