Film Festival Circuit 1: WPFF and 20th French Film Festival

I’ve been going around to many film festivals this past months of June and July – the 20th French Film Festival, the 2nd edition of World Premieres Film Festival and Eiga Sai 2015. It was my first time with WPFF and French Film Festival and my third year attending Eiga Sai. Eiga Sai has been a tradition to me, but the other two were a chance to see some other films.

A humorous story of a not so ordinary family 

I went to see La Famille Belier, the opening film at this year’s French Film Festival. With every film festival, I always go through each and every film to make a shortlist of the films I’d like to see. If the trailer is interesting for me, then that’s more than enough reason for me to see the film. I had two shortlisted films but had to just watch one because unlike Eiga Sai, it doesn’t come free.

La Famille Belier is a heart-warming and humorous story of a family whose parents and son are deaf and must cope with their non-deaf daughter Paula decision to leave for the big city. Paula is the family’s reliable interpreter and helps in running the family’s farm. Despite most of her family members being deaf, Paula and her family live normally just as everyone.

At a music class, her teacher discovers her singing talent and encourages her to join a prestigious competition. At first, Paula wasn’t so interested with the idea of singing but she eventually decided to take up after school lessons with her teacher and started enjoying it. She still continues with her normal day-to-day duties in the farm but hasn’t discussed with her family that she has been taking up singing lessons.

I enjoyed the simplicity of the plot and how her family members interact with each other and do things just like everyone does without the usual conversations, but instead, of actions and sign language.

I appreciate the patience and sincerity of Paula’s character that despite being different from the rest of her family, she doesn’t make them feel like she’s normal and they’re not. Instead, it’s her blending well with her parents and younger brother and tries to understand them in every way she can.

It’s a nice story of a family that’s just like everyone but not so ordinary. A heartwarming path to adulthood story of a teenage girl as she discovers in herself a talent that could be her lifelong dream and passion. It’s about pushing for your dreams even though it might not turn out for the best. And of parents overcoming their fears and apprehension and deciding to support their daughter in spite of so many uncertainties of what could happen to them after their interpreter daughter leaves the family temporarily and of her possible life in the big city.

A 30-something pressured to get married

In this year’s 2nd edition of WPFF, I’ve decided to watch an Indonesian film titled “Kapan Kawin?” (When Will You Get Married) under the ASEAN Skies category. The ASEAN Skies category covers films from 10 members of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN): Brunei, Cambodia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam, Singapore, Indonesia and the Philippines.

What attracted me to the film was that its lighthearted comedy approach to a serious issue, which is about women and getting married before they turn 30. It tells the story of Dinda, played by Adinia Wirasti, a successful 33-year-old hotel manager in the bustling city of Jakarta. But she’s a cut above the rest because she’s still single.

Her parents have been consistently badgering her to get married every year on her birthday, and it gets more troubling for her everytime she gets compared to her older sister who’s seemingly happy in her married life with a businessman and son William. This time, Dinda makes a serious decision and hires Satrio, a street actor to pretend as her boyfriend during the upcoming anniversary of her parents.

While it may not be a very original story, especially with the hiring someone to pretend to be this and that but in other sense, it’s still a different film.

According to producer/writer Robert Ronny who was gave a brief Q&A after the screening, it is a cultural phenomenon for women in Indonesia to be married before they reach 30. Although this social pressure is not heavily felt in the “megapole” Jakarta, but more in other places in Indonesia like Yogyakarta, which is also one of the reasons they decided to shoot the film there. It is considered as an important accomplishment in life for women and for some, being unmarried beyond 25 may even be considered a sin.

Ronny added that he believes in this kind of genre, the film is able to deliver the message of understanding this social pressure in an efficient combination of well-balanced lighthearted at serious elements not only in Indonesia, as well as in other cultures. It also gives light to the topic of following the parents’ wishes even though it may not necessarily be for the best of their children, as well as the parents being more open in accepting their own mistakes and the decisions of their children.

The story’s conclusion might be a little predictable but I highly appreciate the way the story panned out. It wasn’t made in a way that’s too serious or too comedic that it ends up being sloppy. Plus, the story of Dinda is someone anyone can easily relate to, whether you’re 30, 30-something or 20-something, where it also showed the effects of modern society to decisions being made by women of today in their search for happiness in family and marriage.

In any case, most women would have had that experience of being annoyingly asked when they’ll get married or when they’ll have a boyfriend though it may not exactly be culturally-rooted like Dinda’s situation.

The chemistry between the two leads Adinia Wirasti and Reza Rahadian is also one of the driving factors of the film. Most of the humorous scenes were from Rahadian in his interactions with Wirasti and succeeds in bringing out natural laughs from the audience. And not to forget, the film’s cinematography is another I highly appreciate. Since the location is a place I don’t really know much about, the film has wonderfully introduced the place to me in a way I wasn’t expecting. And yes, I really like the ending credits song but until now I still don’t know the title.

So that’s about it for my first time at the French Film Fest and World Premieres Film Festival.

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