13th Cinema One Originals Film Festival: My World Cinema Picks

Before We Vanish: Seeing Ryuhei Matsuda on the big screen twice this year 

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Narumi Kase (Masami Nagasawa) is on bad terms with her husband Shinji Kase (Ryuhei Matsuda) until Shinji goes missing and comes back as a different person.  Meanwhile, a family is brutally murdered and an unexplained phenomenon takes place.

When Cinema Bravo unveiled the full line-up and schedules for the 13th Cinema One Originals Film Festival this past Wednesday, I immediately scrolled down to check the world cinema section, and I couldn’t help myself and jump with joy when I saw Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s “Before We Vanish,” an official selection at the Un Certain Regard section at the recent Festival de Cannes.

The film’s been on my lookout since I came to know about it late last year, all because it stars a big bias actor of mine, Ryuhei Matsuda. Since I’m keeping tabs of his films, I’m quite in the know whenever he has upcoming or new ones out in Japan.

Before We Vanish international teaser trailer

In fact, Before We Vanish was only released September 9 in Japan so that’s like just over two months of gap before it screens for the Cinema One Originals line-up. I’m totally amazed at how the Cinema One Originals committee are so quick to be able to bring these films so fast for the film fest after their run in international film festivals.

I’m totally exuberant because this will be the second time I’ll be getting to watch Ryuhei on the big screen, first at the  Eiga Sai Film Festival this past July with the film “The Mohican Comes Home” (2016).

Ever since I first got to see him on the big screen in “Tada’s Do-It-All House: Disconcerto” (2014), courtesy again of the Japan Foundation’s Eiga Sai Film Fest, his films have been  common fixtures in the line-up every year. It was just unfortunate though when I missed my favorite “The Great Passage” (2013) at last year’s Eiga Sai because of my birthday trip overseas but I’ve seen the movie before this on television via Red by HBO.

So I’m just totally in a euphoric state that I will get to see his latest film, Before We Vanish on the big screen. It’s all thanks to Cinema One Originals for bringing the film for the festival.

As for his director, Kiyoshi Kurosawa, this will be the first time I’ll be seeing a film from the Japanese horror master as he is known in the industry. Just like Hirokazu Koreeda, he’s venturing into new territories with Before We Vanish, which is science fiction, a genre that isn’t very common in the Japanese movie industry. However, it seems Kurosawa has more diverse genres in his films than Koreeda.

His thriller film “Creepy” (2016) was among the line-up at this year’s Eiga Sai but I didn’t get to watch it but I’ve heard of him first from the film “Journey to the Shore” (2015), I think last year as it was part of Cinema One Originals but just the same I haven’t seen it and also “Bright Future” (2003).

The Third Murder: Hirokazu Koreeda’s change of pace

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Shigemori (Masaharu Fukuyama) is an elite lawyer who takes the case of Mikuma (Koji Yakusho), a self-confessed murderer to a crime that happened 30 years ago. Facing the death sentence, Shigemori begins to doubt if Mikuma is the real murderer.

For this film, “The Third Murder,” the reason why this is part of my shortlist is not because of the actor/s but more on the director, Hirokazu Koreeda, as I have seen quite a number of his films before that I really like or love.

IndieWire calls Hirokazu Koreeda as Japan’s “greatest living humanist filmmaker” and I really think this is one of the best ways to describe him. However, their review says about his latest film, The Third Murder, a rare misfire and an unwelcome change of pace.

The Third Murder English Subtitled Trailer

Toronto International Film Festival and The Guardian (The Third Murder review – death-sentence drama leaves you hanging) both have positive reviews.

I myself is actually a little surprised when this came to my awareness few months ago because it’s nothing like any of his works that center on family life and its complexities. And it seems like this is the first time he’s venturing outside the style that he is known for. 

Among my favorites from him are definitely “Like Father, Like Son” (which I saw from the 2015 Eiga Sai Film Fest) and “Our Little Sister” (which I missed from the 2016 Eiga Sai because of a trip but was able to watch at home). I also like “I Wish” (the one with Joe Odagiri and Bae Doo-na) and “After Life”. I have yet to watch last year’s “After the Storm” that stars Hiroshi Abe, Yoko Maki and Kiki Kirin.

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A lot of familiar names are here who starred in his previous films — Masaharu Fukuyama (Like Father, Like Son), Lily Franky (Like Father, Like Son), Suzu Hirose (Our Little Sister). Koji Yakusho also stars but I’m not sure if he’s starred in any of Koreeda’s films before, he’s in a number of Takashi Miike movies than Koreeda.

Despite the sudden change of direction, I’m gonna give this a shot, just because I’m aware of the quality of Hirokazu Koreeda’s films and that he always or most often than not delivers.

Call Me By Your Name: This year’s best of summer love

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Italy, summer of 1983, precocious 17-year-old Elio (Timothée Chalamet) is spending the summer at his parents’ villa in Lombardy when he meets Oliver (Armie Hammer ), a doctoral student and intern of his father. Amid the sun-drenched splendor of their surroundings, Elio and Oliver discover the heady beauty of awakening desire over the course of a summer that will alter their lives forever.

Out of my three shortlisted films, only one isn’t Japanese nor Asian, and that is  Luca Guadagnino’s film adaptation of the 2007 novel of the same name by André Aciman, “Call Me By Your Name,” starring Armie Hammer and Timothée Chalamet, that had its debut at the Sundance Film Festival and is now garnering a place as one of the favorites to win best picture Oscar in February. 

In this case, neither the director nor the actors is my reason for choosing it. I saw the trailer to this few months back but I don’t remember how I came to find it on YouTube, but I was enamored by how beautiful it is from the trailer alone. The only cast that I know of is Armie Hammer but the rest of the cast and the director are fairly new to me.

Call Me By Your Name Trailer

I also can’t help but take notice of the song playing in the latter half of the trailer, and how it makes me wanna watch the film even more with it. I went looking for the song and it’s called “Mystery of Love” by Sufjan Stevens, who also composed the song specifically for the film, as well as two more songs included in the original motion picture soundtrack. Now I’m thinking of getting the OST.

From the looks of it, it won’t be hard for me to fall in love with this film when I see it in full.

The 13th Cinema One Originals Film Festival runs on November 13-21 at Trinoma, Glorietta, Gateway, UP Cine Adarna, Cinema 76 and Cinematheque, and extended run from November 22-28 at the PowerPlant Mall.

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Blade Runner anime short: Black Out

I just saw Blade Runner anime short – Blade Runner: Black Out, and it makes me feel like I wanna watch a full series of anime Blade Runner. Can we get an animated version of Ryan Gosling, director Shinichiro Watanabe?

From live action to anime / From anime to live action

It’s ironic how an original live action film/series, when it becomes an anime version; most often, the anime version enhances the original, or at par with the original and at times, even better than the original.

Blade Runner: Black Out is an original anime short though, but it’s still based on an original live action film, and serves as the prequel and bridge between the original 1982 film and the new Blade Runner that’s out starting next Friday.

However, this is not the case when it’s the other way around — when anime is the one being turned into live action version, such as the awful case of Netflix’ Death Note and Ghost in the Shell. Then there’s also the ever escalating dread to the newly-announced Hollywood remake of 2016’s biggest hit, that is Makoto Shinkai’s Kimi no Na wa (Your Name). And more of that dread is expected to spread like wildfire up to when Paramount with JJ Abrams on the helm, finally reveals a teaser of the live action remake.

Manga Hokusai Manga at the Ateneo Art Gallery

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Manga Hokusai Manga: Approaching the Master’s Compendium from the Perspective of Contemporary Comics 

The exhibit runs until July 28 at the Ateneo Art Gallery.

An international traveling exhibition organized by the Japan Foundation is an exploration of the similarities and differences between Katsushika Hokusai’s manga and modern Japanese manga, with works from seven contemporary manga artists from the basis and influence of Hokusai’s manga.

Before I checked out the exhibit, I attended “Manga and the ‘Manga-esque’:
Shifting Definitions and Perspectives,” a lecture by Dr. Karl Ian Uy Cheng Chua, director of the Ateneo de Manila University – Japanese Studies Program. 

The talk centers on how “manga” and the perceptions of “manga” have changed, and how “manga” is consumed and produced in the Philippine context. The talk hopes to present the expansive reach and influence of manga, as well the problems it can encounter overseas.

Dr. Chua started by asking ‘what is manga?’ My answer to that — it’s a drawing with a story, it has Japanese characters, has Japanese context, it has panels and dialogue balloons, that it is read from right to left, and that it’s a source material for anime and film adaptations. I didn’t say it though, it was just in my head while talking to myself. 


To me, I think of manga as very Japanese because it’s highly culturally-rooted. It’s no longer manga to me when there’s no element of being Japanese in it — not the creator, not the story, nothing; even though the style is like a manga, I would only call it copying a manga but not a manga.

I was in a dilemma when Dr. Chua showed on the presentation some examples and I found myself at loss and confusion if it’s manga or not.

I realized that defining manga is complex as there’s no standard definition as compared to Hokusai’s manga. The definition and perceptions as to whether one is to be called a manga is now not only based on the cultural appropriateness of the content — the style, story, and characters. It’s expansive and ever-changing depending on one’s basis and analysis on why one would categorize it as manga whether it’s made by a Japanese mangaka or not. 

Everything Japanese

 

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The last day of Eiga Sai Ph at the Shang Cineplex was on July 16, Sunday. And like how the film festival always starts during the first week of July, it also always concludes before or after my birthday — so the dates always include my birthday. However, this year it actually concluded on my birthday.

It kinda reminds me of how Harry Potter either premieres a new movie before or after my birthday or during November. It’s only either July or November.

I decided to skip Saturday, July 15 screening of “Anthem of the Heart” and ended up losing P100 because I already have a ticket but then again, if I went I would have lost more money than just P100 because I would have to spend more.

So I opted to watch something on the last day instead. Initially, I was looking at watching Naomi Kawase’s “Sweet Bean” despite having doubts about it for having read negative reviews when it premiered at the 2015 Cannes Film Festival.

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Then again, I couldn’t watch it because I was again late and so I ended up watching the documentary “Tsukiji Wonderland.” The docu is part of my shortlist but not really a high priority but I must say, it’s a better choice to have watched the docu instead.

I may have missed seeing inside the Tsukiji Fish Market last year, I only saw it from the outside on my late night walk; seeing the documentary makes me feel like I had ventured into every corner of the fish market in reality. And because I love fish, it was a sight how the Japanese put so much high regard with the fresh seafood culture and how they both have fun and in-depth knowledge about what they do and take pride in it.

 

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A lime torte cake that I was able to buy on a last-minute decision from Starbucks because it’s the only one that’s open when I went out of Shang. 
I haven’t had a cake since Ryuchan’s birthday last May 9th. I say it like I was actually there on his birthday. Delusional me.

DANCE DANCE ASIA: Crossing the Movements

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I remember when I used to dance back in high school, it was one of those things I really love to do then. I haven’t been dancing since high school but I would still like to do it, but it’ll take awhile to get used to again. I don’t really consider myself to be that of a really good dancer, I have a friend who was also a member of the school’s dance troupe who’s a better dancer. She’s one of those popular ones when one mentions the subject of the dance troupe.

In the same manner to dancing, I like to attend events; I mean free events like this one from the Japan Foundation Manila. It’s the first-ever cultural exchange project by street dancers in Asia spearheaded by JFM’s new special unit Asia Center and Dance Dance Asia.

I found myself really active for the past two years or so attending events by the Japan Foundation, since I got into my previous job as an associate editor/writer for a community newspaper for Filipino communities in Japan. I specifically like it when it’s July, as it’s the month when they hold the Japan-Philippines Friendship month; so they hold more events during this month such as the Eiga Sai and the toy exhibit.

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I initially wanted to attend this event with two of my college friends, unfortunately one of them couldn’t decide. Eventually, I invited JC, who’s two of my friends’ younger sibling and happens to share the same educational degree as mine. I guess that’s one thing that makes us blend well.

It was my first time ever seeing a full dance show and so was he, so it makes the experience a lot more momentous for both of us. I’ve been to K-pop concerts with singing and dancing performed at the same time, so I’m quite exposed to how K-pop concerts go. I have yet to attend concerts of vocal artists like 4Men, Brown Eyed Soul, Urban Zakapa or LYn. It would be really such an experience to see them live. And like I said this was the first dance show ever for me, so I was really excited. I have to praise myself for deciding to go.

Part of the thrill for this was I didn’t know any of the performers, apart from they were Japanese dancers. That feeling that I didn’t know what to expect added to the total experience I had. It featured three amazing dancing groups of different genres:  TAPDANCERIZE,TOKYO GEGEGAY and s**t kingz.

The members of TAPDANCERIZE

The members of TAPDANCERIZE during the closing greetings: Satomi Toma, Jun’ichi Sunayama (bass), Gunjo, Takeru Yamazaki (piano), Shinsuke Sada and Yuji Uragami.

The first group performer was TAPDANCERIZE, composed of three dancers: Yuji Uragami (Leader) | Gunjo | Satomi Toma and musicians: Shinsuke Sada (Gt) | Takeru Yamazaki (Key) | Yozo (Sax) | Jun’ichi Sunayama (Bass). The group is a dance percussion group with stimulating steps.

I was totally impressed with them being the opening act. It was another first to see a real tap dance performance live, so I just couldn’t help but be amazed with their combination of tap plus jazz dance, break dance, soul dance and ballet; and accompanied by live music of sax, bass, guitar and piano. I really admire the smooth harmony with their performances, specially with different dance genres combined. Aside from the tap sounds from their shoes, I’m simply blown away how it blends so naturally with the live music. The tap sounds aren’t just simple sounds, they come with a melody and different movements create different sounds.

And just the fact that they explored rhythm-tap dance style that’s originally from black folk culture is already a feat. Tap dancing is the finer kind from the three performers, as it’s more intricate – something like ballet that focuses heavily on the strength, agility and movement of the legs than the upper body. I consider it an unconventional choice of dance genre for professional dancers.

And according to my research, two major variations of tap dancing are Broadway tap that is widely performed in musical theater and focuses on dance, and rhythm (jazz) tap that focuses on musicality and considered as part of the Jazz tradition. In dance, musicality is the matching of movement and form to the rhythm, melody, and mood of the music being played. Like I said, it’s the finer kind, the one that belongs to an elegant category as it’s predominantly used in musical theater. For TAPDANCERIZE, they performed both variations in defining ways and had the audience experience both a musical theater and a jazz performance.

JC and me with Yuji Uragami and with Gunjo (top right)

JC and me with Yuji Uragami and with Gunjo (top right)

My favorite performer’s got to be Gunjo, who I was able to take a photo with after the show. He’s got this natural humoristic persona on stage while performing, although it wasn’t just him but also Yuji; whereas the only girl from the group was the most expressive one. And they’re really interactive with the audience as well. In regular concerts, artists usually interact with the audience when they take breaks from the performances; but with them they have incorporated that unique and humorous style of interacting with the audience while dancing. I think that takes an uncommon talent.

The group’s website is http://uragamiyuji.com/. They perform in live music clubs, on film, TV commercials, and are active in many other scenes.

The members of TOKYO GEGEGAY

TOKYO GEGEGAY members: Yuyu, Bow, Marie, Miku and MIKEY (in no chronological order)

TOKYO GEGEGAY is lead by MIKEY, who has worked as both a choreographer and back-up dancer for Miliyah Kato, BoA, Crystal Kay and MISIA to name a few. According to their profile, the group was formed to participate at the 5th season of Dance@Hero, a dance contest in Japan in which they took the title.

The group’s set of performances is something I’d consider the closest to the predominant dance style in K-pop, but they’re definitely more creative. Well, that doesn’t come as a surprise when one of them has actually worked as a choreographer for someone like BoA. Their performances were like watching a real and live music video, without the fluff of CG effects and other embellishments. It’s of that quality, although without the singing of course. Their choreography and the execution is something I’ve never seen in K-pop, which is really becoming generic by the days with idol groups coming out with dancing songs one after the other, that I couldn’t distinguish who’s who anymore.

Photos during the closing greetings

Photos during the closing greetings

Their set-up was at a classroom with MIKEY as the teacher and the other four as students while they learn English, science, math, arts and home economics. Each performance’ theme is based on each subject, except for the last one. I particularly like best the science dance. The science performance was like watching straight out of a film, with two of them wearing gas masks and lab clothes – the one scientists wear to protect themselves and then breaking into a dance sequence. It evoked this freak out feeling with the smoke as if they’re going into a place like the Fukushima Nuclear Plant.

Another would be the arts dance. They came out clad in silky long black skirts that are attached to all five of them. It looked like a long elegant table clothed wrapped to their waists. Some of them were standing on chairs, arranged in an elevated way to form a triangle. And then there’s the four members’ heads covered with black handbags. It was kinda creepy, in a good way creepy but creative and cool. The performance had this goth appeal to it.

But among their performance, I have to say I love it best when they danced to Utada Hikaru’s Goodbye Happiness. I totally flipped when I heard it, but it looked like I was the only person who actually know the song from the audience. And there’s always a favorite member for me, it’s the second girl from the right. She’s so bubbly, cute and perky.

The group’s website: http://tokyogegegay.com/

The members of s**t kingz: Shoji, Kazuki, NOPPO and Oguri (in no chronological order)

The members of s**t kingz: Noppo,Oguri, Shoji and Kazuki (in no chronological order)

s**t kingz was formed on October 2007 and was the winner of the dance contest Body Rock in California for two years in a row. They’ve worked as both choreographers and back-up dancers for artists such as Daichi Miura, Mariah Carey, SHINee and EXO among others. They also hold dance workshop tour.

Just like TAPDANCERIZE, I consider s**t kingz’ style more of the street dance kind than that of TOKYO GEGEGAY. They danced with chairs for their first performance, wearing simple white long sleeve shirts and chino pants. And right that moment, I was mesmerized. I always love a choreography that involves the use of chairs, I guess ever since Shinhwa’s chair dance with Wild Eyes. I have to say the song really got me too, unfortunately I don’t know the title of the song. ( I’m hoping JC could get the set list from JFM or we’ll just try to ask the group directly).

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What I like about them best is that watching them perform feels like watching a stage musical. They don’t need flamboyant props or costumes, but they get through you with their flawless interpretation of the songs through their movements. They’re telling you their version of the songs’ story and it just adds to the total atmosphere of the performances, as well as my reaction to the message of the song. It’s just like when a singer has to interpret a song in her own way, but I think dancing gives a different kind of feeling to the audience and how it affects your impression of a song; especially because you’re watching it and not listening to it. In this case, dancing is more expressive than singing.

For the group performances, I specifically love when they danced to Bruno Mars’ Locked Out of Heaven. Watching it made me feel like wanting to learn the choreography myself. It makes you really want to move and dance along. I particularly like the moves that perfectly capture the climactic part of the song. There were some funny moments too, as when the chorus hits, they had this funny expressions while they’re singing along to the song. I couldn’t help but laugh. NOPPO, the tallest one was the funniest from the very start, from their first performance.

Here’s a video of them performing the same set, since video/photo taking during the show weren’t allowed.

My favorite solo performances were from the second guy from the right who danced to Michael Jackson’s Leave Me Alone and the guy first from right, with the mic, who performed to Justin Timberlake’s Strawberry Bubblegum; the guy’s super and he effortlessly brings out the JT charm with his own dance moves.

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Thank you from the wonderful performers

Honorable mention would be Oguri’s performance to Ms. Seductive by Jeff Bernat. I have the group to thank, specifically him for introducing me to this beautiful song. And this is such an expressive song and I was able to see how he’s really feeling the song, like he’s the guy in the song who fell for this girl but couldn’t find a way to do something with the butterflies she gives him. He could be a wonderful actor.

The group’s website is http://shitkingz.jp/

Among the three groups, I like TAPDANCERIZE and s**t kingz best, I did enjoy TOKYO GEGEGAY a lot as well.

We really enjoyed (2) hours of purely breathtaking, awesome, one of a kind, high-class showcase of great dancing talent of the Japanese. It was a great show of sensational dance performances of different genres.

Thank you JFM and Dance Dance Asia!

Check out JFM and Dance Dance Asia to know more about JFM’s programs and Dance Dance Asia tour.

Some videos during the closing greetings. They taught us some dance moves as we danced along to them to the music of Mark Ronson’s Uptown Funk.

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DANCE DANCE ASIA: Crossing the Movements is a project of The Japan Foundation Manila – Asia Center to support the exchange and collaboration of Asian regional dance companies/dancers that are based on street dance, including not only hip-hop but a variety of genres such as jazz dance and contemporary dance.

The Manila 2-day event is the introductory performance and the first-ever cultural exchange project by street dancers in Asia. It features three amazing dance groups from Japan: TAPDANCERIZE,TOKYO GEGEGAY and s**t kingz. Held at Carlos P. Romulo Auditorium, RCBC Plaza, Makati, Ph.

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So there goes a wonderful night, and ends with a cup of Raspberry Truffle Mocha.

So there goes a wonderful night, and ends with a cup of Raspberry Truffle Mocha.

 

 

 

Book Love – A Geek in Japan

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I’m finally able to snap my very first travel related book acquisition after not seeing my camera for (4) months.

I missed you Canon, you’ve been away for (4) months without me, at least one of us got to go away this year and had a really long vacation. I’m so envious, you got to see places I didn’t see. 

I bought the camera last January and been looking forward for another trip by myself this year and having to use this camera, unfortunately I wasn’t able to do so this time. It’s a promise I made to  myself but having failed for the first time ever since I started it, I just feel bad about it.

In any case, I’m loving this book. On An Extremely Brief History of Japan (page 10,chapter 1), it says that Japan was born of the love between two deities: Izanagi and Izanami. These two deities had a daughter named Amaterasu, and the long dynasty of Japanese emperors descends from her.

When I read the names Izanagi, Izanami and Amaterasu; I was like “Oh my, Naruto!” Kishimoto Masashi must have taken inspiration from Japanese history to create the Uchiha clan’s signature Izanami, Izanagi and Amaterasu jutsu.

When I got into Naruto years ago, I heard that tailed beasts like Kurama for instance came from Japanese folklore. But I didn’t know much about it other than that basic information, so when I read the chapter about visiting shrines and temples in Japan, I found out that sacred foxes or “kitsune” in Japanese is a common sight in Shinto shrines. They are believed to be messengers of Inari – the god of fertility. A sacred fox’ power can be determined by the number of its tails, the more tails it has means the more powerful it is. When it has nine tails, the highest number of tails it can have; it means it is of the most powerful kind.  I instantly thought of Kurama and nothing else. This just shows how Naruto is so attached and faithful to its Japanese heritage and history.

A Geek in Japan is definitely a great buy. It’s like a one-stop shop of everything Japanese, an efficient way of learning about the basics on culture and people without being seriously academic.

 

The Promise That Was Kept: Kakashi,Obito and Minato

Minato stopping Kakashi before he’s able to kill Obito

Awww. Minato and his students Kakashi and Obito. 😥 My impression upon seeing this photo from Naruto Shippuden Ep. 387 – The Promise That Was Kept.

Just watched the episode and wow, what a moment among the three of them. So many feels. Indeed my favorite scene of this episode and definitely one of my favorite episodes now.

It starts with Naruto offering his hand to Obito. At some point, Obito was about to shake hands with Naruto but suddenly changed his mind and strangled Naruto. Naruto punched him hard to free himself. And when Obito stood up, he saw his younger self in Naruto and recalls a day with Minato, Kakashi and Rin as if experiencing it again.

While still seeing his past, his younger self tells him that Rin won’t even turn to look at the present Obito and drags him. Snapping into the present, his younger self turns into Naruto. This is the perfect exploration of Obito being haunted by his past, despite his efforts to forget all those memories.

Obito talking to Kakashi, telling him that he has nothing left in his hole heart.

Sasuke was about to charge against Obito after all the tailed beasts were extracted from him, but stopped when Kakashi appeared. Kakashi says,”I was once his classmate and friend. So please let me take responsibility for him.” He was about to stab Obito when Minato stopped him.

That moment when he stopped Kakashi from stabbing Obito, proved how much he loves this two. He says, “Obito, when we had that chakra tug-of-war just now, I got to see inside your heart. It seems like my son nagged and lectured you quite a bit. I think he might have gotten that from his mother.” Naruto was slightly embarrassed when his dad Minato said he got his talk-no-jutsu from his mother Kushina. Well it’s true anyway. Then while talking to Obito he turns to Kakashi, “But that duty falls on you. I think the one who truly understands Obito and should talk to him is you, his friend, Kakashi.” He looks at Naruto and says, “Isn’t that right, Naruto?”

Naruto and Sasuke

Naruto and Sasuke

And Naruto realizes what he has been doing all this time for Sasuke. He looks at Sasuke with that serious realization, how he had never given up his hopes for Sasuke, how he never managed to hate and severe his ties, or simply abandon and forget about Sasuke – his only best friend, close to him like a brother. Just as Naruto and Sasuke are the same, Kakashi and Obito are the same as well. So it only makes sense that Kakashi, the one in a more logical state of mind should be the one talking Obito out.

On a side note, it warms my heart and makes me smile to see how Naruto and Sasuke are fighting together for the same goal, at how finally they’re on the same page and Sasuke finally accepts and understands what Naruto has been trying to tell him all this time. ヾ(@^▽^@)ノ

I feel like I’m drowning watching this moment, being drowned by feels. This episode is full of brotherly and mentor-student love.

Minato is just so forgiving, he couldn’t even bring himself to hate Obito for what he did that made Naruto an orphan and everything else. He could have let Kakashi kill Obito right there, but he knew it would also hurt Kakashi to do it, just as when he had to do it with Rin.  Instead of hating Obito for everything, but first and foremost for destroying what could have been his wonderful family; he is saddened by what his student had become. He feels disappointed at himself, for his shortcomings for not being able to guide him better. Had he been there for him, he would not have turned out this way. 

Naruto meets Kushina, his mom.

In the same sense that Naruto managed to put aside his personal emotions, as he was able to put out his hand to reach out to Obito. He’s a stronger young man now, he understands Obito, despite that one fact that Obito was the reason he lost his parents on the day he was born. 

Kushina telling Minato of the baby news. This is the sweetest ever. I just love how they’re both overjoyed.

It’s just natural for him to be angry or even hate Obito for it. It’s how humans fundamentally are. Obito not only destroyed Naruto’s chance of a family, to grow up with his parents; he also damaged Minato and Kushina’s chance to be there for Naruto. A perfect revenge it may seem. 

Naruto meets Minato for the first time and finds out The Fourth Hokage is his dad

I recall that episode when Naruto was so angry with Pain (Nagato) during his battle with him for killing Jiraiya. That anger was one of the strong catalyst that caused him to lose it and have Kurama gain control over his entire body. He was entirely losing himself to Kurama, he was at the brink of hopelessness until Minato appeared before him in his psyche. Eventually, he learned of Pain’s true nature and his reasons for being what he is.

He had learned a lot from that event to not let his hate/anger overcome him this time with Obito. I think it’s also one of the things he had gotten from his dad Minato, as Minato is naturally like that and after Minato shedding some light to Naruto about the cycle of love and hate that drives the whole shinobi system.

Team Minato – Minato, the Fourth Hokage and his students Kakashi, Obito and Rin

40

“I think you were younger than Naruto is now. Do you remember? All the missions that the four of us went on. As a medic nin, Rin did her utmost to protect you two. She would never have wished for a situation like this.” Kakashi drops his hand holding the kunai and Minato let go of his arm. “But what caused this is my responsibility.” Then we see the flashback of that fateful Kannabi Bridge battle.

“It’s no coincidence that I, who should be dead is standing before you two like this. Perhaps it was Rin who made it happen. Her way of scolding me for failing as your teacher. I’m sorry I couldn’t protect Rin.”

Team Minato on their mission at Kannabi Bridge

I seriously do not agree about the idea of Minato taking all the responsibility. Yes, he was responsible for them, they were his students but at the same time, there’s just simply no way he could have controlled or be responsible of everything. It wasn’t his fault Rin died. Kakashi understood that. If only Obito had a more open mind back then, if he tried to find the real answers from Minato and Kakashi; Minato and Kushina would still be alive.

“Rin was my only light and hope. After I lost Rin, the world as I saw it, changed. It became a pitch black hell. There was no hope in this world. Even with my Sharingan, I couldn’t see anything. There was nothing to see,” says Obito.

Kakashi killing Rin

Minato and Kushina’s sacrifice for Naruto and the village

Somehow, I kinda feel bad for Obito cause all this time he allowed himself to be engulfed by so much darkness and hate after losing Rin and be used for that. But Kakashi was no different either; he thought he lost Obito, he lost Rin and even had to do it himself and eventually he lost his sensei Minato. It was equally as hard or even more difficult for Kakashi to deal with all that.

Obito giving his Sharingan to Kakashi as his gift to him for being a jounin.

And as Kakashi tells Obito that he himself went through the same experience as him, it brings both of them back to that moment when Obito gave Kakashi one of his Sharingan. Kakashi tells him that he tried his best to see the world through Obito’s eye and that as long as he had Obito’s Sharingan and words, he could see it. To which Obito answers,”And what you saw is Naruto?”

Obito is still unconvinced at how Naruto’s path would be successful than his. But Kakashi instead believes more on Naruto’s strong perseverance on his dreams and reality. And his natural talent for drawing people closer to him, making them give their full support to reach his goal more than his chances of failing.

But I am glad Minato is there, if not, Kakashi would have really finished Obito for good and it would leave Kakashi deeply scarred again. Had Obito died here, he would die still deep in his darkness, full of hate and still not realizing his mistakes. Rin would not be happy to welcome him when they meet again.